The Wager and Other StoriesThe Wager and Other Stories

Three stories of extraordinary science fiction comprise this collection, the first in the series of Jospar, the Starflyer. Author Greg Sushinsky has brought a unique touch and originality to his work which provides an unforgettable dimension of wonder, adventure and meaning. Join the many readers who have already entered and enjoy this world.

In a world that devalues creativity, writers stand in a courageous place.
--Greg Sushinsky

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Free daily dose of word power from Merriam-Webster's experts
  • Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for February 26, 2021 is:

    megillah • \muh-GHIL-uh\  • noun

    1 slang : a long involved story or account

    2 slang a : an elaborate, complicated production or sequence of events

    b : everything involved in what is under consideration : ball of wax

    Examples:

    "Well, one fine day last spring, I was laying off for a week at the Americana in New York when Solly phones me—a megillah about this inspiration that he and some other bookers had that morning in the steam room." — S. J. Perelman, The New Yorker, 18 Aug. 1965

    "We'll have more on 'Manbird' when the whole megillah drops September 18, but for now, the buoyant first single of the same name is available to stream." — Aaron Davis, The Sacramento (California) Bee, 25 Aug. 2020

    Did you know?

    Megillah derives from the Yiddish megile, which itself comes from the Hebrew word mĕgillāh, meaning "scroll" or "volume." (Mĕgillāh is especially likely to be used in reference to the Book of Esther, which is read aloud at Purim celebrations.) It makes sense, then, that when megillah first appeared in English in the mid-20th century, it referred to a story that was so long (and often tedious or complicated) that it was reminiscent of the length of the mĕgillāh scrolls. The Hebrew word is serious, but the Yiddish megile can be somewhat playful, and our megillah has also inherited that lightheartedness.



  • Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for February 25, 2021 is:

    slipshod • \SLIP-SHAHD\  • adjective

    1 a : wearing loose shoes or slippers

    b : down at the heel : shabby

    2 : careless, slovenly

    Examples:

    "'What's worse is the rules about misinformation on social media are confusing and inconsistent, and enforcement of those policies is slipshod at best,' says Bill Fitzgerald, a privacy and technology researcher in CR's Digital Lab." — Consumer Reports, 13 Aug. 2020

    "But Ryan Day couldn't help but harp on a slipshod second half in which the Buckeyes were outscored by 10 points and outgained by 126 yards." — Kyle Rowland, The Toledo (Ohio) Blade, 9 Nov. 2020

    Did you know?

    The word shod is the past tense form of the verb shoe, meaning "to furnish with a shoe"; hence, we can speak of shoeing horses and horses that have been shod or shodden. When the word slipshod was first used in the late 1500s, it meant "wearing loose shoes or slippers"—such slippers were once called slip-shoes—and later it was used to describe shoes that were falling apart. By the early 1800s, slipshod was used more generally as a synonym for shabby—in 1818, Sir Walter Scott wrote about "the half-bound and slip-shod volumes of the circulating library." The association with shabbiness then shifted to an association with sloppiness, and the word was used to mean "careless" or "slovenly."



  • Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for February 24, 2021 is:

    fathom • \FA-thum\  • verb

    1 : to make a searching exploratory investigation : probe

    2 : to take soundings

    3 : to measure by a sounding line

    4 : to penetrate and come to understand

    Examples:

    Even those close to him can't always fathom why he repeatedly risks his life to climb the world's tallest mountains.

    "When the coronavirus pandemic struck, we expected the real estate business to hit a brick wall and never fathomed the possibility of 2020 becoming a record year for the Houston market." — Richard Miranda, quoted in The Houston Agent Magazine, 14 Jan. 2021

    Did you know?

    Fathom comes from Old English fæthm, meaning "outstretched arms." The noun fathom, which now commonly refers to a measure (especially of depth) of six feet, was originally used for the distance, fingertip to fingertip, created by stretching one's arms straight out from the sides of the body. In one of its earliest uses, the verb fathom was a synonym of our modern embrace: to fathom someone was to clasp the person in your arms. By the 1600s fathom had taken to the seas, as the verb was used to mean "to measure by a sounding line." At the same time, the verb also developed senses synonymous with probe or investigate, and it is now frequently used to refer to the act of getting to the bottom of something, figuratively speaking.



 

The Wager

The saga of Jospar The Starflyer and Kasceto The Ruler begins.

 
 

Cobalt

Join Jospar on his journey -- As His Story Continues.

 
 

Roscoe

Roscoe pits Jospar against the dangerous Kasceto.